Lower School Summer Reading & Math 2018

 

  • Summer Math for Returning Students (Coming Soon)
  • Summer Math for New Students (Coming Soon)
 

Summer Reading for Children Entering Pre-Kindergarten

Create the habit of bedtime reading.  This will be essential to your child’s success and ensuring a lifelong love of reading.  There are many wonderful books that you can read to or with your child.  You are not limited to these suggestions and there is no written work; simply enjoy this special time together. 

Favorite Authors

Jez Alborough

Eric Carle

Donald Crews

Lois Ehlert

Bill Martin Jr.

David McPhail

Don and Audrey Wood

Concept Books

ABC Books

Counting Books

Color Books

Shape Books

Favorite Bedtime Stories

Nursery Rhymes

Assorted Titles by Dr. Seuss

It Looks Like Spilt Milk by Charles G. Shaw

Five Little Monkeys by Eileen Christelow

Quick as a Cricket by Audrey Wood and Don Wood

Napping House by Audrey Wood and Don Wood

I Went Walking by Sue Williams

Who is the Beast? by Keith Baker

Farmer Duck by Martin Waddell

Tomie dePaola’s Mother Goose by Tomie dePaola

Bunny Cakes by Rosemary Wells

Chicka Chicka Boom Boom by Bill Martin Jr.

Love You Forever by Robert Munsch

All By Myself by Mercer Mayer

 

 Summer Reading for Children Entering Kindergarten

Create the habit of bedtime reading.  This will be essential to your child’s success and ensuring a lifelong love of reading.  There are many wonderful books that you can read to or with your child.  You are not limited to these suggestions and there is no written work; simply enjoy this special time together.

Favorite Authors

Eric Carle

Lois Ehlert

Denise Fleming

Mem Fox

Helen Lester

Eric Litwin

Bill Martin Jr.

Laura Numeroff

Dr. Seuss

Mo Willems

Don and Audrey Wood

Favorite Bedtime Stories

Countdown to Kindergarten by Alison McGhee

The Kissing Hand by Audrey Penn

I Love You the Purplest by Robert Munsch

I’ll Love You Forever by Robert Munsch

Wemberly Worried by Kevin Henkes

Kindergarten Rocks by Darlene Kenny

Pete the Cat by Eric Litwin

David books by David Shannon

The Night Before series by Natasha Wing

Summer Reading for Entering First Graders

Create the habit of bedtime reading. This will be essential to your child’s success and ensuring a lifelong love of reading. There are many wonderful books that you can read to or with your child. You are not limited to these suggestions; simply enjoy this special time together.

Choose at least five books to read and record each one on your reading log. 
Bring your completed reading log to school August 15th.

Link to the First Grade Reading Log

Favorite Authors

Tedd Arnold

Frank Asch

Jan Brett

Eric Carle

Tomie dePaola

Lois Ehlert

Denise Fleming

Mem Fox

Kevin Henkes

Helen Lester

Leo Lionni

Robert Munsch

Laura Numeroff

Todd Parr

Audrey Penn

Dav Pilkey

Amy Krause Rosenthal

Dr. Seuss

David Shannon

Jan Thomas

Rosemary Wells

Mo Willems

Karma Wilson

Don and Audrey Wood

Favorite Series

Pete the Cat by Kimberly and James Dean

Elephant and Piggie by Mo Willems

Pigeon by Mo Willems

Max and Ruby by Rosemary Wells

Little Bear by Maurice Sendak

Curious George by J. J. Reyes

Franklin by Brenda Clarke

Froggy by Jonathan London

Little Critter by Mercer Meyer

Todd’s World by Todd Parr

Fly Guy by Tedd Arnold

Elephant and Piggie by Mo Willems

Dragon by Dav Pilkey

Curious George by H. A. Rey

Llama, Llama by Anna Dewdney

Splat the Cat by Rob Scotton

Charlie and Lola by Lauren Child

Quality Non-Fiction

Look for non-fiction books on topics in which your child wants to learn more. These books should include high quality photographs and text that is not too challenging for your child to read. We highly recommend National Geographic Kids.

Favorite Bedtime Stories

The Night Before First Grade by Natasha Wing

10 Minutes Till Bedtime by Peggy Rathmann

Guess How Much I Love You by Sam McBratney

Brand-New Pencils, Brand-New Books by Diane DeGroat

Mrs. Watson Wants Your Teeth By Alison McGhee

Ruby by Maggie Glen

Best Friends for Frances by Russell Hoban

Jamaica’s Find by Juanita Havill

On the First Day of Grade School by Emily Whatley

Some Dogs Do by Jez Alborough

My Friend Bear by Jez Alborough

Scaredy Squirrel by Melanie Watt

Dragon Masters by Tracey West and Nina De Polonia

Henry and Mudge by Cynthia Rylant

Biscuit by Alyssa Satin Capucilli and Pat Schories

Charlie and Lola by Lauren Child

Summer Reading for Entering Second Graders

Create the habit of bedtime reading. This will be essential to your child’s success and ensuring a lifelong love of reading. There are many wonderful books that you can read to or with your child. You are not limited to these suggestions; simply enjoy this special time together.

Choose at least five books to read and record each one on your reading log. 
Bring your completed reading log to school August 15th.

Link to the Second Grade Reading Log

Favorite Authors

Tedd Arnold

Nic Bishop

Marc Brown

Eve Bunting

Gail Gibbons

Steven Kellogg

Mercer Meyer

Allen Say

Cathryn Sill

Favorite Series

Magic Tree House by Mary Pope Osborne

The Littles by John Peterson

Arthur by Marc Brown

Nate the Great by Marjorie Weinman Sharmat

Fluffy by Kate McMullan

Minnie and Moo by Denys Cazet

Fly Guy by Tedd Arnold

Magic School Bus by Joanna Cole

Encyclopedia Brown by Donald J. Sobel

Black Lagoon by Mike Thaler

Clifford by Norman Bridwell

Franklin by Paulette Bourgeois

Horrible Harry books by Suzy Kline

Henry and Mudge books by Cynthia Rylant

Frog and Toad books by Arnold Lobel

Challenging Chapter Book Series

Boxcar Children

      by Gertrude Chandler Warner

Secrets of Droon by Tony Abbott

A to Z Mysteries by Ron Roy

Junebug Books by Alice Mead

Marvin Redpost by Louis Sachar

Judy Moody by Megan McDonald

Amber Brown by Paula Danzinger

Time Warp by Jon Scieszka

Jake Drake by Andrew Clements

Jigsaw Jones by James Preller

Ramona by Beverly Cleary

Dr. Carbles is Losing His Marbles and other books by Can Gutman

Summer Reading for Entering Third Graders

The love of learning is one of the best habits parents can help their child establish. Thank you for encouraging your child to develop this lifelong habit. Research states that a summer without books can result in a decreased reading level. We recommend that incoming third graders read at least 20 minutes each day. Frequent reading builds stronger comprehension and vocabulary skills.

One goal of the third grade curriculum is to help students build stamina in reading. When children are given choice in selecting books, they tend to read longer books over longer periods or time. The following list includes suggested titles for many interests at varied levels.

Before beginning their reading, students should print the book report form, bookmark, and reading log so they are readily available for notes. The book report form, each bookmark, and the reading log are written assignments that will be due the first week of school.

Entering third graders are to read THREE books:

One choice (suggestions below), one biography, and one book of poetry.

One grade-level appropriate biography such as Odd Boy Out: Young Albert Einstein by Don Brown or a book about:

Helen Keller, Benjamin Franklin, Rosa Parks, Thomas Edison, Frederick Douglass, Elizabeth Blackwell

Complete the book report form for the biography you read.  Complete each line with the information requested.                

 Link to the Biography Book Report form

One children’s book of poetry - A few suggested titles include:

Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein

A Pizza the Size of the Sun by Jack Prelutsky

If I Were In Charge of the World by Judith Viorst

Dinosaur Dinner with a Slice of Alligator Pie by Dennis Lee

Sing a Song of Popcorn, Every Child’s Book of Poems by M. White

A Bad Case of the Giggles by Bruce Lansky

Select your favorite poem and bring a copy to class.  In August, you will share this with your classmates. Complete the attached bookmark.

Link to the Poetry Bookmark

One book selected by the student, such as:

Roscoe Rile Rules (series) by Katherine Applegate

Ivy and Bean (series) by Annie Barrows

Tumtum and Nutmeg: Adventures Beyond Nuthouse Hill by Emily Bearn

Ava Tree and the Wishes Three by Jeanne Betancourt

The Mouse and the Motorcycle by Beverly Cleary

Mercy Watson (series) by Kate DiCamillo

Bink and Gollie by Kate DiCamillo

Nikki and Deja and the Newsy Newsletter (series) by Karen English

Kidnap at Catfish CafĂ© by Patricia Reilly Giff

Sugar Plum Ballerina (series) by Whoopi Goldberg

Just Grace (series) by Charise Mericle Harper

Martin Bridge (series) by Jessica Scott Kerrin

Alvin Ho (series) by Lenore Look

Ruby Lu (series) by Lenore Look

Gooney Bird is So Absurd (series) by Lois Lowry

Stink: The Incredible Shrinking Kid (series) by Megan McDonald

Scraps of Time (series) by Patricia McKissack

Roxie and the Hooligans by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

Magic Tree House (series) by Mary Pope Osborne

Clementine (series) by Sara Pennypacker

A to Z Mysteries by Ron Roy

Little House on the Prairie (series) by Laura Ingalls Wilder

Enter the books that you read this summer to your Summer Reading Record. Be prepared to tell your classmates about the books you read this summer.

Link to the Summer Reading Record

Summer Reading for Entering Fourth Graders

Entering fourth graders are to read TWO books:

The Cricket in Times Square by George Selden

One non-fiction or one mystery from the titles provided.

Before beginning a book, print and fold the bookmarks so they are readily available while reading.  The bookmarks include prompts to support the development of comprehension strategies.  We encourage our students to make connections, visualize, reflect, make inferences, wonder, summarize, and synthesize. 

Each bookmark is a written assignment and due during the first week of school.  Each will count as a reading grade.

All entering Fourth Graders are to read:

The Cricket in Times Square by George Selden

Click the link below to view and print bookmark. You may print and make notes on more than one bookmark. When school begins in August, you will receive an in-class assignment based on this book.

Link to The Cricket in Times Square Bookmark

For your second book, choose one of the following:
One grade-level appropriate non-fiction book:

Suggested series include:

Eyewitness Books

Eyewitness Science Books

Dorling Kindersley Readers

Nature’s Children

Discovery Channel School Science Books

Time for Kids Science Scoops

Capstone Press offers the following:

Extreme Sports

Learning about Horses

Learning about Dogs

Learning about Cats

Animals and the Environment

Sharks

Motorcycles

Click the link below to view and print bookmark. You may print and make notes on more than one bookmark. When school begins in August, you will receive an in-class assignment based on this book.

Link to the Non-Fiction Bookmark

OR One mystery from the following list:

Candymakers by Wendy Mass

Masterpiece by Elise Broach

Scat by Carl Hiaasen

Name of This Book is a Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch

Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart

Harriett the Spy by Louise Fitzhugh

Any book from the following series:

Nancy Drew by Carolyn Keene

Hardy Boys by Franklin W. Dixon

39 Clues by Rick Riordan

Sammy Keyes by Wendelin VanDraanan

Hank the Cow Dog by John R. Erickson

Treasure Hunters series by James Patterson

Vanished  series by James Ponti

Beast of Backslope (in the Sherlock Files series) by Tracy Barrett

Click here to view and print bookmark. You may print and make notes on more than one bookmark.

Link to the Summary Bookmark

Have a picture taken of you reading your favorite book in your favorite spot.  Bring this to school on August 15th.

During the first two weeks of school, each student will present an oral book review to his/her class.  This review should include the title, author, and brief summary, and a statement with supporting details and opinions why others should or should not read this book.

 Summer Reading for Entering Fifth Graders

Entering fifth graders are to read TWO books, one biography and one fiction that may be from a series listed below.

Before beginning a book, print the Tree Map for the biography and the form for the fiction novel so they are readily available for notes.  These are considered written assignments and are due during the first week of school.  They will count as reading grades.

All entering Fifth Graders are to read a biography.

Choose a person who interests you.

Complete this Tree Map which is due the first week of school:

Link to the Biography Tree Map

Your notes should include meaningful information and be concise. A Tree Map is a way to list facts and details by categories. Do NOT use complete sentences but clearly state the information you learned about this person. You will be able to use your Tree Map as a resource while completing your in-school assignment.

Read a book from one of the following series or a fiction book of your choice:

Sammy Keyes by Wendelin Van Draanen

The Wayside School by Louis Sachar

Island by Gordon Korman

Capture by Kathryn Lasky

Warriors by Erin Hunter

Prydain by Lloyd Alexander

Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer

The Hardy Boys by Franklin W. Dixon

Nancy Drew by Carolyn Keene

Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket

Eragon by Christopher Paolini

Charlie Bone by Jenny Nimmo

Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis

Diary of a Wimpy Kid  by Jeff Kinney

Harry Potter Series by J. K. Rowling

Treasure Hunters by James Patterson

Books by David Liss including titles such as Renegades, Rebels, or Randoms

Books by Ernest Hemingway

The Sherlock Files by Tracy Barrett

The Hobbit Series by J.R.R. Tolkien

Classics by H. G. Wells

Record the information about your novel on the attached form.

Link to the Summer Reading Fiction Form

When you return in August, you will use these notes to complete an in-school project.

Summer Reading for Entering Sixth Graders

Dear Rising 6th Graders,

You are responsible for reading TWO books before you begin 6th grade.  Please read Wishtree by Katherine Applegate, our 6th grade Community Book.   The second book must be a choice from the list provided.  You will be responsible for taking notes and expressing your ideas about what you have read, and your reading teacher will be looking for your work on the first day of school.  Use the Summer Reading graphic organizers to help you keep track of your thoughts as you read.  You will also complete a Two-Column Chart for the two books that you read.   Enjoy your summer reading!

                                           Link to Assignment Templates

Rising Sixth Grade Book Choice List (Choose one)

Anything but Typical by Nora Raleigh Baskin

Because of Mr. Terupt by Rob Buyea

Bird Face by Cynthia T. Toney

Bystander by James Preller

Freak the Mighty by Rodman Philbrick

Ida B.... and Her Plans to Maximize Fun, Avoid Disaster, and (Possibly) Save the World by Katherine Hannigan

A Mango-Shaped Space by Wendy Mass

Mockingbird by Kathryn Erskine

Out of my Mind by Sharon M. Draper

Rules by Cynthia Lord

The Schwa Was Here by Neal Shusterman

Tangerine by Edward Bloor

Terror at Bottle Creek by Watt Key

The Thing about Jellyfish by Ali Benjamin

Touch Blue by Cynthia Lord

Twerp by Mark Goldbatt

Waiting for Normal by Leslie Connor

Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech

Wonder by R.J. Palacio

Wringer by Jerry Spinelli

Directions for a Two-Column Chart (AKA Double-Entry Journal)

On separate paper, create a two-column chart for each of your two summer reading books (one must be from the recommended list, and the other can be a book of your choice).  In the left-hand column, cite some important lines from the text.  In the right-hand column, record reactions to those citations.

Label the left-hand column “Citation” and the right-hand column “Significance.”

In the left-hand column, list no fewer than 4 and no more than 6 quoted passages that you found significant to the book’s central idea or author’s message.  These passages may include descriptions of specific characters, persons, events, images or places; citations may be dialogue or regular prose.  Citations must include page number references.  Please include at least one citation from the beginning, middle, and end of the text.

In the right-hand column, explain, in your own words, the importance of each citation as it relates to a theme or main idea of the book.  Try to show a thoughtful response by explaining your thoughts about the importance of the citation, your connections to the citation (text-to-text or text-to-world), or your questions about the quote (what does the quote make you wonder about?) The more analytical/critical your explanation, the better.  Don’t just summarize the cited material. 

To complete this assignment, you may wish to use Post-its, markup the text, or record notes on a separate piece of paper while reading.  Ultimately, you will complete and submit your two-column chart to your sixth grade reading teacher on the first day of school.  Each two-column chart will be graded.  Moreover, the two-column chart will serve as a piece of prewriting for an English class writing assignment in the first marking period

Example of a quote and a reaction from Frank Baum’s The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

Citation

Significance

“But I do not want people to call me a fool, and if my head stays stuffed with straw instead of with brains, as yours is, how am I ever to know anything?” (Baum 26)

[Please note that the citation is in quotes.  It should appear exactly as it appears in the text.  Furthermore, the citation is followed by a parenthetical citation that includes the author’s last name and the page number.  We’ll review MLA citation style in class, but do your best to follow this format over the summer.]

When Dorothy, the main character, meets Scarecrow, she helps him down from his perch.  In the citation, Scarecrow explains (to Dorothy) that he doesn’t mind having a body stuffed with straw because he cannot get hurt.  However, he fears living with a head filled with straw because he feels he will never know anything.  Scarecrow joins Dorothy’s quest to go to the Emerald City because Scarecrow desires the capacity to possess knowledge.  It seems like all the characters are on a search for something they feel they need to be better or to be happy.  When I think about the Scarecrow’s mission, it makes me wonder if I sometimes take my ability to think and learn for granted.  In Social Studies class, I learned about third world countries such as Ethiopia that struggle to provide food, shelter, and education to their population.  I’m grateful for my opportunity to read, write, and learn in school on a daily basis because I do not face the struggles from Scarecrow’s story or the real-life lack of educational opportunities of children in third world countries.

  

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